Ryves Blog - AMP only benefits Google

We do get asked about the benefits of developing AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) websites. For those who don’t know, AMP is a Google initiative that at face value seems like a good idea; using stripped down HTML (in this case AMP-HTML) and less JavaScript to improve site speed on mobile devices, is laudable. So, the idea is intrinsically good and based on principles that competent developers should be aiming at anyway, most importantly fast site performance and therefore a better visitor experience.

Unfortunately, the positives end there. AMP reduces the flexibility the developer has (and therefore the end-client) by imposing a new set of rules (n.b. 'rules', not 'standards') set by Google that are for nobody’s obvious benefit except for Google's. Do people really want to build two separate websites (one using AMP and one for desktop consumption) and bear the additional development costs involved? Also, the ‘lock-in’ to Google’s JavaScript file that is required at the top of all AMP pages and its hosting of the cache is, to say the least, troubling. Google’s stated objective of prioritising AMP pages in its search results (presumably over possibly faster and well-optimised mobile-friendly sites that don’t use AMP) is slightly sinister.